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Source : Hypotheses.org

"A" for Appearance: The Culture of Clothing. “The Art of Tailoring”

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (20 juin 2016)

“There is nor Church nor private in the Western Indies, who does not consume this kind of gold silk brocade; it has then to be considered for significant and its consumption shall rather increase than diminish, especially on occasions where vice-royalties looking for pomp and glory will walk ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

"F" for Fan: Fashionable fans. PhD Georgina Letourmy-Bordier, Fan Expert

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (4 juil. 2016)

Folding Fan with ivory serpentine sticks and painted silk palmettes, circa 1680s.©The Fan Museum, Hélène Alexander Collection (Greenwich, London) Folding Fan with ivory serpentine sticks and painted silk palmettes, circa 1680s.©The Fan Museum, Hélène Alexander Collection (Greenwich, London) ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

"R" for Recycling Brocaded Silk, from Profane to Sacred. Bernard Berthod, Dr Es Lettres, Curator Musée de Fourvière (Lyon), Vice-Chair of ICOM-Costume Committee

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (16 janv. 2017)

Aux XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles, la paramentique est souvent l’affaire des couvents même si dans les grandes villes, des tailleurs et brodeurs proposent des vêtements liturgiques. Les pieuses fidèles alimentent régulièrement les monastères par des dons de robes et d’étoffes variées, souvent ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

“D” for Damask: "The Night Watch of the costume world.” Claude Fauque, Textile and Dress historian

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (23 juin 2016)

Dress made of Silk, 17th c. Texel, Kaap Skil Museum Madame Henriette de France (1721-1752), Jean-Marc Nattier (1685-1766). Versailles, châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon, MV4455 La Déclaration d'amour, Jean-François de Troy (1679-1752). Berlin, Stiftung Preussische Schlösser und Gärten, ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

“M” for MANTA. Lena Bjerregaard, Conservator, Guest Researcher, Centre for Textile Research/SAXO Institute, University of Copenhagen

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (1 déc. 2016)

In the pre-Columbian times the woman’s outer garment was the mantle, or the manta. The mantle (Spanish: Manta, Quechua: Lliclla) of the pre-Columbian Inca ladies was a square textile, which was held together with a pin in the front. This garment was for many centuries the favourite over garment ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

“Y” for Yellow Moiré silk Dress. Laura G. García-Vedrenne, M Phil student in Textile Conservation, Centre for Textile Conservation, University of Glasgow.

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (21 nov. 2016)

A stunning yellow moiré dress from the early 18th century is conserved in the collection of the National Museum of History in Mexico City. This dress consists of two parts: a bodice that closes at the front, and a skirt that was probably worn with a small panier underneath. Both of them were ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

“E” for Embroidery: Mission Style in Alta California. Mariachiara Gasparini, Adjunct Lecturer, Art & Art History department, Santa Clara University, California

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (22 sept. 2016)

Discovered in a box in the Church of Santa Clara de Asís, California, a group of about one hundred pieces including liturgical vestments and related items from the Mission era, today represents the most important part of the historical collection in the de Saisset Museum next to the Mission Church ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

“L” IS FOR LYON. THE MARKETING AMBITIONS OF EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY FRENCH MERCHANT MANUFACTURERS, OR WHERE DID ALL THE LYONNAIS SILKS GO? LESLEY MILLER, SENIOR CURATOR OF TEXTILES, VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM, LONDON/PROFESSOR OF DRESS AND TEXTILE HISTORY, UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (31 déc. 2016)

Lyon in the south-east of France was by the late 17th century the silk-weaving capital of Europe, its products ranging from simple, lightweight plain silks to elaborate brocaded silks woven with silver and gold. It was to these patterned silks that the city owed its reputation, as designers created ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

“C” for Court Dress: An elaborate masterpiece made of green silk velvet, 1780-1790. Laura G. García-Vedrenne, Conservator, National Museum of History, Mexico

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (24 août 2016)

“Besides, the consumption of all sorts of silk fabrics should be seen in Mexico as the main point of its commerce; clergy men, gentlemen, merchants, bourgeois, artisans, craftsmen and even Africans and mulatto, they all dress in silk for most part of the year. Therefore Spain, together with France ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

“S” for Stockings: Made in Europe – but where? Edwina Ehrman, Curator of Textiles and Fashion, Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (8 juil. 2016)

Pair of women's stockings of knitted silk, made in Spain, mid 18th Century. London, Victoria and Albert Museum, T.156-1971 Detail, pair of women's stockings of knitted silk, made in Spain, mid 18th Century. London, Victoria and Albert Museum, T.156-1971 Detail, pair of women's stockings of knitted ...

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