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Source : Hypotheses.org

How different are head-marking constructions?

Haspelmath, Martin (10 mars 2014)

In the recently published festschrift for Johanna Nichols (Bickel et al. 2013), Robert Van Valin updates his earlier treatment of head-marking constructions in Role and Reference Grammar (RRG, cf. Van Valin 1985). Van Valin starts by noting that in head-marking constructions, such as (1) from ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

How to talk about role coding: cases and index-sets, nominative/accusative, subject/object, agent/patient

Haspelmath, Martin (8 mai 2012)

As an Athabaskanist working in Russia, Andrej Kibrik has long been interested in the head-marking/dependent-marking typology: Athapaskan languages mark the major clause roles by person prefixes on the verb, whereas the languages of Russia (Uralic, Turkic, Nakh-Daghestanian, etc.) almost all show ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

The limits of curiosity

Hill, Nathan W. (5 févr. 2014)

Talmy Givón in “Beyond structuralism: Should we set a priori limits on our curiosity?” (Studies in Language 37.2, 2013, pp. 413-423), answers the rhetorical question of his subtitle with an emphatic 'no'. In addition to a proponent, he is an avid practitioner of unrestrained curiosity, a ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

Nouns are prosodically privileged over verbs

Haspelmath, Martin (7 juil. 2012)

At the recent LIPP Symposium on parts of speech in Munich, one of the most interesting papers was Jennifer L. Smith's paper on "Parts of speech in phonology" (see also Smith 2011). She examines 20 languages from 11 families and finds that in almost all cases where nouns, verbs and adjectives behave ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

Strong evidence that the roots of binding constraints are pragmatic from Cole et al. (2015)

adelegoldberg (14 juil. 2015)

Cole, Hermon, and Yanti’s (2015) new paper is an extremely important contribution that is likely to have a powerful impact on debates that focus on where grammatical constraints in languages come from. The authors compare Traditional Jambi Malay (TJM) with a dialect of Jambi Malay spoken in Jambi ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

“Impersonality” cross-linguistically

Haspelmath, Martin (28 mars 2012)

At the 2008 annual conference of the SLE in the Italian provincial town of Forlì, Andrej Malchukov and Anna Siewierska organized a workshop on “Impersonal constructions: a cross-linguistic perspective”. In August 2011, a 641-page volume was published by Benjamins, edited by the two workshop ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

Annotated corpora of small languages as refereed publications: a vision

Michaelis, Martin Haspelmath and Susanne Maria (12 mars 2014)

It has often been said that the job of linguists working on a small language is not complete until they publish three major works on the language: a grammar, a dictionary, and a volume of texts.  This threefold result of extended fieldwork has been described as the “Boasian triad” (e.g. ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

How typology has changed since the 1970s

edithmoravcsik (17 déc. 2013)

Based on my experiences in the Stanford Universals Project in 1969-76, it seems to me that the substance and goals of language-typological research were the same then as they are today: the study of the distribution of structural characteristics across languages and in particular, the search for ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

The necessity of grammatical structures

Hieber, Daniel W. (24 févr. 2014)

A great deal of digital ink has proliferated (I won't say has been 'spilled' because that would imply it was done in waste) about the question of linguistic complexity, and whether it is possible to show in a meaningful way that some languages are more or less complex than others. After reading ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

Should linguistic diversity be conserved like biodiversity?

Haspelmath, Martin (23 juin 2012)

This is not a question that Gorenflo et al. (2012) ask in their widely publicized PNAS article on the “co-occurrence of linguistic and biological diversity”. They seem to subtly presuppose a positive answer, but one wonders about the precise implications of this. The contribution appeared as a ...

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